2 UBA Segula seniors earn Advanced Placement B.A. degrees

Two twelfth-grade students from UBA Segula, Tzofia Ronen and Moriah Ben-Sassoon, earned B.A. degrees in Computer Sciences from the University of Haifa while still in the twelfth grade through the university’s Etgar Program, which offers highly motivated and achievement oriented high school students extracurricular advanced placement courses leading to college degrees.

Ruchama Hazut, the ulpana’s principal, said, “It inspires pride and admiration to see our students achieve so much academically, while maintaining their humility, good nature and religious beliefs.”

UBA Segula in Kiryat Motzkin was founded in 1965 as the YBA network's third ulpana high school for girls. Today the school serves over 525 students from the Haifa region and entire northern half of Israel.

View video of UBA Segula's 2014 'March of the Living' Tour of Poland

Six YBA students win academic scholarships

The Neve Sha’anan College in Haifa granted full academic scholarships toward earning a B.A. degree to six girls in the YBA network: Noa Attias, Sapir Amar and Sapir Simchi from UBA Or Akiva, and Chen Cohen, Tehila Maman and Tiferet Shimeon from UBA Meron.
Tehila Maman
Tiferet Shimeon
Chen Cohen













“We pride ourselves with giving each and every girl the attention and support she needs in order to bring out her full potential for excellence, with openness, dialogue and love,” said the Rosh Ulpana of UBA Or Akiva, Mrs. Bilha Bussi, in congratulating her students for their accomplishments.

UBA Meron was established in 1975 and serves over 315 students from the towns and settlements in the Galilee, while UBA Or Akiva was established 25 years later, in 2000, and serves today 111 students for the town of Or Akiva and the surrounding area.
 
View video of 2014 Elul activities at UBA Meron
 

Rabbi Drukman wins award; comes out against alternative conversion courts

YBA Chairman, Rabbi Haim Drukman
Rabbi Haim Drukman, Rosh Yeshiva of YBA Yeshivat Hesder Or Etzion and Chairman of the YBA Educational Network in Israel, was awarded the coveted Prize for Torah Literature by the Torah and Wisdom College, citing the six books already published, as well as the many books presently being worked on for future publication. Last year’s prize was awarded to Rabbi Yehoshua Weizmann, the Rosh Yeshiva of YBA Yeshivat Hesder Maalot Yaakov.

Rabbi Drukman headed the Conversion Authority within the Prime Minister's office for many years, and is critical of the way conversion is being conducted today by the Haredi-dominated Chief Rabbinate. Neverthe less, Rabbi Drukman is opposed to the recent move by other religious Zionist rabbis to establish alternative conversion courts outside the Israel Chief Rabbinate.

Read  more about Rabbi Drukman's position on the current controversy shaking the religious Zionist community in Israel:

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/199289#.VdNEBpvotLM

http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/is-it-mutiny-independent-rabbinic-court-competing-with-chief-rabbinate-on-conversions/2015/08/11/




YBA Tikvat Yaakov wins Traffic Safety Prize


YBA Tikvat Yaakov was awarded the first prize for Traffic Safety Education. “We took a holistic approach to teaching traffic safety in the school, said Yair Harel, the program’s coordinator, “the subject was taught as a unit in every subject of study.”

Yeshivat Tikvat Yaakov, Sde Yaakov  is a religious Zionist and junior and high school Yeshiva founded in 1954 by Mercaz Yeshivot Bnei Akiva. Located adjacent to Moshav Sde Yaakov, midway between Haifa and Nazareth, the Yeshiva enjoys the scenic panoramas of the beautiful and historic Jezreel Valley. The school commemorates the name of the late Rabbi Dr. Yaakov Hoffman z”l and the Ehrman campus is named for the parents of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ehrman.

The school is one of the leading institutions in the Yeshiva Bnei Akiva network and most of its students continue in yeshivot, yeshivot hesder, mechinot and serve in the IDF, many in combat units.
Today the junior high school and high school serve over 300 students from throughout the northern district, including 30 Ethiopian olim.
 
Although many students come from economically disadvantaged homes, the school’s success rate in “bagrut” matriculation exams is well above the national average.

UBA Neria Student cited as Youth Volunteer of the Year

Rotem Ne’eman, a twelfth grader from UBA Neria, won the “Youth Volunteer of the Year” Award for the Jerusalem region for her work with developmentally challenged children for “Kav L’chaim” (Lifeline) and other organizations. “It’s touching to know that you are appreciated,” she said, humbly, “It gives me great satisfaction.”

Ulpanat Bnei Akiva Neria was established in 2004 and serves 280 students from settlements in the Binyamin Regional Council today.

View Video of UBA Neria students preparing spiritually for Rosh Hashana.

15 YBA schools included among the top schools in Israel

The Ministry of Education released last week its list of top ranking high schools in Israel. This is the third time that the ministry has used a ranking system featuring a variety of parameters to determine which schools are the leading "value-laden" schools in the country, rather than basing school ranking solely the percent of students matriculating for admittance to institutions of higher education. According to the ministry's ranking system, 15 of the top 261 high schools (6%) belong to the Yeshivot Bnei Akiva educational network in Israel.

YBA Director General,
Elchanan Glatt
 Elchanan Glatt, Director General of YBA, said in response to the publication of the new ranking, "We are proud of our faculty members, who invest in each and every student. These rankings show that education toward Torah values and excellence go hand in hand. We will continue in this path of value-laden education, because we are convinced that it is the right way."

The teachers in the top 261 schools were rewarded with salary bonuses raging from $750 to $2,000 based on their school's relative position on the list. 
 
The relative weighting of the various measures were adjusted this year, after critics of the new ranking system last year claimed that the weighting favored schools in the religious Zionist sector. Even after the adjustments, however, about 40% of the top 261 schools this year were from religious Zionist educational networks.


The ranking system measures applied to over a thousand high schools in Israel included:

  • individual instruction plans according to each student's abilities and disabilities
  • consistency of ongoing faculty involvement in the implementation of instruction plans
  • level of faculty in-service training for ongoing professional advancement
  • inclusion of special needs students in school framework and extent of mainstreaming
  • faculty interventions to reduce student drop-out rate
  • percentage of graduates serving in IDF and National Service
  • involvement of students in voluntary community service projects (Tikun Olam)
  • percentage of graduates achieving full matriculation certificates and average scores
  • level of studies offered in Humanities, Mathematics and the exact Sciences
  • maintaining a matriculation examination process free of irregularities
  • rate of improvement in all parameters over previous year's scores
The YBA (yeshiva) and UBA (ulpana) high schools making the top schools list are:
  1. YBA Kinor David, Ateret .........................(joined YBA in 2010; 120 students)
  2. YBA Beit Shmuel, Hadera ........................(established in 1962; 210 students)
  3. YBA Pirchei Aharon, Kiryat Shmuel .......(established in 1961; 317 students)
  4. YBA Lapid Torat Nachum, Modiin .........(established in 1998; 823 students)
  5. YBA Ra'anana, Ra'anana ..........................(established in 1960; 308 students)
  6. YBA Sussya, Sussya ..................................(established in 1998; 158 students)
  7. YBA Aderet, Bat Yam ...............................(established in 1970; 274 students)
  8. UBA Neot Avraham, Arad ........................(established in 1968; 163 students)
  9. UBA Orot Modiin, Modiin ........................(established in 1998; 713 students)
  10. UBA Segula, Kiryat Motzkin ......................(established in 1965; 529 students)
  11. UBA Neve Ruchama, Jerusalem ................(joined YBA in 2008; 288 students)
  12. UBA Or Akiva, Or Akiva ...........................(established in 2000, 111 students)
  13. UBA Reut, Petach Tikvah ...........................(joined YBA in 1984, 353 students)
  14. UBA Neria, Neria ........................................(established in 2004; 279 students)
  15. UBA Tzfira, Zafaria ....................................(established in 1967; 626 students)
  16. UBA Ramat Karniel, Kfar Pines ................(established in 1960; 458 students)
 

Rabbi Drukman speaks out against religious extremism and violence

YBA Educational Network Chairman, Rabbi Haim Drikman
Many uninformed or misinformed American Jews think that Bnei Akiva schools teach their students to be extremists. Nothing can be farther from the truth.

On Friday, in response to two terrible incidents that took place the day before, Rabbi Haim Drukman, the Chairman of the YBA Educational Network in Israel spoke out yet again against all forms of extremism and violence, whether against Arabs or Gay Jews.


YBA is all about teaching moderation, which is according to Rambam, 'the golden path.'
READ MORE

YBA Alumni Profiles: Eli Orgad, owner, 'Burger Ranch' fast food chain

Eli Orgad
Eli Orgad was born and raised in Netanya, the sixth son in a family of nine children. "I grew up smelling the feet of my brothers. We slept in the same bed with their legs tucked up by my nose. Eli studied at YBA Yad Avraham, a residential yeshiva high school in Netanya. “I was a rebellious kid,” he recalls, “I didn’t always get up in time for morning prayers. I remember once my father was called into the office after a long day at work, and he said to me, ‘Wait till you have kids and they do to you what you’re doing to me!’”

It was at the yeshiva where Eli got his first taste in business – selling wafer snacks to his fellow students every evening. “The sound of a wafer being crunched while studying at night is something that nobody can resist,” he laughs. "My father always said that I would become a businessman."

At the age of 21, when Eli finished his army service, he couldn’t afford to go straight to college, so he established his first company instead – a cleaning service. At first, the word "company" was a little big for the operation, which relied mainly on him cleaning stairwells himself. But he had a vision, and by the outbreak of the First Lebanon War in 1982, his company was already cleaning forty office buildings. “When you want to go to university and don’t have money, the only thing you can do is cleaning stairwells,” says Eli. He finally received a Law degree 25 years later, from the Ono Academic College.

When war broke out in Lebanon, Eli was called up for reserve duty and his younger brother, Yuval, tried to keep the company alive, but it didn’t really work out. When Eli returned from the battlefield, he discovered that most of his customers had left. But the branch manager of Bank Mizrahi had faith in him. “He extended my credit line because I was in the reserves,” says Eli, “and I have stayed with him in gratitude ever since.”

Eli’s company, Orgad Holdings, Ltd., acquired the Burger King chain of fast food restaurants in Israel in 2003, and later, the more veteran Israeli Burger Ranch chain as well. In 2008 the company merged the two chains and eliminated the Burger King label, making Burger Ranch, with over 100 branches, the sole competitor to MacDonald’s in Israel. “We did extensive market research and found that Israelis preferred the taste of the Burger Ranch products. We saw sales jump 35% in every branch we converted to the Burger Ranch label.”

Eli, a man of faith, is happy to share his worldview: “Israel is the land of endless possibilities. If a person wants to succeed here - he can do anything. That's how I opened business after business. What is stopping someone from opening tomorrow a clothes shop on Sheinkin Street, or any other business? Nothing. You can do whatever you want, start a business and think all day about how to bring in costumers. That's what I do now. Every day I think about how to bring customers to the branches, so they will be full all day long. That’s what I do.”

“But it’s important to always remember to be a good person. I study Gemara once a week, and try to be a good person. Employees remain with us for many years, because I believe we must treat everyone nicely and be a ‘mench’. If an employee is short of money, he knows he can come to me and I'll give him loan.”

What’s Eli’s advice to a 22 year-old, just getting out of the army today?  - “Do what you love to do, as long as you stick persistently to your goal. You cannot be successful without putting your soul into whatever you choose to do. If you can afford college, go study; then, go do whatever your heart desires.”
YBA Nachal Yitzchak, Nechalim

YBA Nachal Yitzchak, established in 1955, is one of the oldest schools in the YBA educational network. Today the school serves 485 students in both residential and non-residential tracks. 

YBA Alumni Profiles: Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, founder, "Shurat HaDin" Israel Law Center

Nitsana Darshan-Leiter
Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, a graduate of  Ulpanat Bnei Akiva Yeshurun in Petach Tikvah, is an Israeli attorney and human rights activist. The organization she founded - Shurat HaDin - the Israel Law Center, whose lawsuits on behalf of terror victims against terrorist groups, their leaders and financial patrons, has earned her the Moskowitz Family Foundation "Oz Tzion" Prize, and being named by the Jerusalem Post as one of the 50 most influential Jews in the world.

"I remember my years at the Ulpana as happy times. I still stay in touch with some of my friends from high school to this day," said Darshan-Leitner in a recent interview. "In the Ulpana I learned values of leadership, social justice, and fortitude in the face of hardship, which I put into practice today in my professional work. I think that the nerve I have today to take on precedent-setting cases stems from my time at the Ulpana. At the time I wanted to become a doctor, but apparently the drive for seeking justice, and the oratory and debating skills I developed in high school led me to the Law profession instead."

The Israel Law Center has won judgements valued at over $1 billion against numerous banks financial institutions and countries for aiding and abetting Islamic and Arab groups engaged in terror attacks, and over $120 million in payments to victims of terror attacks. 

Ulpanat Bnei Akiva Yeshurun in Petach Tikvah
UBA Yeshurun joined the YBA educational network in 1978 and is the largest high school for girls in the network today with 1,300 students. 

View interview of Nitsana Darshan-Leiter in English on i24 News

YBA Alumni Profiles: Lt. Matan Horesh, YBA Givat Shmuel

In his first interview since Operation Protective Edge, Lt. Matan Horesh talks about his decision to enter the tunnel to search for Lt. Hadar Goldin, his nagging sense of personal failure, the many months he refused to talk about the operation, and his objections to the Facebook campaign to give him a medal

by Tal Ariel Amir, Ma’ariv Online, July 11, 2015
Lt. Matan Horesh (Photo: Ariel Besor)
Sometimes at night Lt. Matan Horesh returns to that day, “Black Friday,” in the Gaza Strip, when he chased through the tunnel where Hamas terrorists dragged the body of Lt. Hadar Goldin, z”l. He relives the scene again; he feel of the dank concrete walls and the darkness that enveloped him and Lt. Eitan Fund. In his dream they stride forward, shoulder to shoulder, searching in the dark for their kidnapped comrade. Suddenly the terrorists step out before them. Fund and Horesh open fire and manage to kill them, then make their way back, carrying Goldin on their backs wounded, but still alive.

That is the dream that Lt. Horesh, the officer who received a citation for his bravery in battle for what happened that night, prefers to dream. On other nights he wakes up disappointed when the painful reality slaps him in the face. In some dreams, he is walking alone toward the end of the tunnel when he sees the barrel of a gun pointing at him between the eyes, with a terrorist’s finger about to pull the trigger. That's when he wakes up.

Lt. Hadar Goldin, z"l
The battle of Rafah, on Friday, August 1, 2014, is considered one of the most significant battles of Operation Protective Shield. Three fighters from the Givati recon unit, the commander, Major Benaya Sarel, Lt. Hadar Goldin and Staff Sergeant Liel Gidoni, were killed by Hamas an hour after the announcement of a cease-fire. The attempted abduction of Goldin and the heroic effort to rescue him resonated loudly in the media. But while Fund was presented as the hero who found the evidence that led to the pronouncement of Goldin's death, it seemed that Horesh was absent from the headlines. His frustrated friends pressured him to tell about his part in the incident, but the officer preferred to remain silent.

When the IDF’s Citation Commission published its intention to decorate Fund, a friend of the Horesh family decided to open up a Facebook page calling for Lt. Horesh to be awarded the Order of Courage medal. The impact of the campaign on the officer was like an unwanted bear hug. Only later did it become clear that Horesh was on the top of the list of soldiers to receive decorations, along with the other fighters involved in the tunnel episode.

Lt. Matan Horesh (Photo: Ariel Besor)
In his first in-depth interview, Lieutenant Horesh, who will start next week training cadets at the IDF Combat Officer Training Base, discusses his decision to enter the tunnel with Fund, the months of silence about the operation and his reservations about the campaign calling on the IDF to give him a medal: “I knew that the intentions were good, but I really disliked the campaign, because I was afraid people would think I was behind it," he says. 'I don’t have a Facebook account, so at first, I didn’t know what impact it had on the public and the media. But when people began to mention it to me, I immediately forbade my family to be interviewed and asked them to erase the page.”

Were you afraid that the public would doubt your worthiness if you were to receive the Citation for Courage because of the campaign?
"At no stage did I stop to think about if receiving a medal would hurt me or not. It’s just that all the hoopla is not my nature. After the operation, I concentrated on my soldiers and our operational deployments in the field. I just didn’t feel comfortable about the campaign. I don’t care about what people think about me; what is most important to me is that I tried to save Hader.

How did you react when you retreated from the Gaza Strip and left Hadar Goldin behind?
The moment when we left Gaza seemed strange to me. I didn’t feel that we are abandoning Hadar, the battalion did everything to find him at all costs, and the evidence of that is that the family was able to give him a burial. However, I had the feeling of a missed opportunity. In the final analysis, we returned to Israel and he was not with us."

Today, a year after Operation Protective Edge, you think Goldin's rescue operation should have been handled differently?
'I have only myself to criticize. Sometimes I think maybe I should have run faster in the tunnel; or maybe I shouldn’t have gone back to get reinforcements. But now, in hindsight, I see that the possibility of finding Hadar was doomed from the start because of the element of time. It took several minutes before it became clear to us that he was abducted, and until we entered the tunnel. In all likelihood by that time he was already out the other side, in the heart of the Hamas stronghold."

"I acted like a robot"
Horesh started Operation Protective Edge as a young second lieutenant, straight out of Officer Training School and intended for the job of Engineering and Sabotage squad commander, in the Givati Brigade’s Reconnaissance Battalion. He received his squad just ten days before the ground forces entered the Gaza Strip, and one day before the start of the operation. Initially Horesh’s squad was intended to deal with the evacuation of the wounded, however, just before the zero hour, his orders were changed to provide security back-up for the company commander, Major Eli Gino. The operation was a challenge for the beginner commanding officer. He did not know his squad of fighters, their strengths and weaknesses, and he had no time to run drills alongside them beforehand.

Hamas terror tunnel in Gaza
Saturday, July 19, was set as the day the Givati Reconnaissance Battalion would enter Gaza. The fighters’ objective was to seek out and secure tunnels used by Hamas combatants in the Rafah District. After a day of searching without success, the regiment returned to Israel, and the next night went into the Khirbet Khizeh neighborhood further to the north. “We situated ourselves with the battalion's command post in one of the houses, around which the rest of our units were stationed,” says Horesh. “In the morning one of our units identified three terrorists coming up from the ground, and killed one of them. The our battalion identified two snipers. One of them was killed and the other captured and used as a source of information. Because of him we found a tunnel with a cache of weapons, hidden under the rubble of a house.

When did you see Benaya for the first time?
I didn’t know him personally, but I saw him at every briefing with the battalion commander. I remember he always demanded high-quality performance and was highly motivated. The most memorable thing I remember him saying was when he asked the company commander if he would make it home for his wedding, which was scheduled for two weeks later. It impressed me. Everyone told Benaya that the operation will be behind us by then. I was closer with his communications assistant, Liel Gidoni, who went through boot camp with me. I never saw him when he wasn’t smiling and calm.”

Lt. Matan Horesh (Photo: IDF Sokesperson)
The battalion came and went to and from Khirbet Khizeh, until it was decided to return to the area of Rafah again, a day before the kidnapping. There were rumors of a ceasefire and we wanted to find the tunnel that we couldn’t find on Sunday,” says Horesh. “We congregated at the staging area and then I had a moment of crisis. I was tired and I thought about the squad of soldiers I got. There was no time for a briefing and I didn’t really know the soldiers well. I felt alone. I found a few seconds of silence and opened my cellphone. That was a mistake. WhatsApp was full of messages about Roey Peles, my friend from the officers' course. They all wrote that he was killed, but I didn’t react. I called a friend and heard that I missed the funeral and shiva. I hung up the phone, I sat down on the sand and just cried. That was the first time someone so close to me was killed. After a few minutes I realized that I had to separate my emotions from the fighting, and to work only with my head. From that moment, I turned off my phone and functioned like a robot. I can understand the dilemma and the desire of soldiers to hear what's going on with other forces, but when you need to fight, it hurts motivation and can be depressing.”

Did you have bad feelings about the continuation of fighting?
“Just when I was told we were going into Rafah for the last time, because the next day will be a ceasefire, I thought about Ehud Goldwasser and Eldad Regev, who were captured on the Lebanon border on the last day before a cease fire. I was afraid that the soldiers will be less vigilant, and that could be a weak point. I spoke with them, I told them to be vigilant and said that it’s impossible to know what will happen; that there may be surprises waiting for us, because a soldier could still be killed tomorrow. After that, I took out my tzitzit, which I had left in my pack because of the heat, and I decided I would wear them until the end of the fighting.”

"We were afraid that everything was booby trapped"
On Thursday night, July 31, the regiment returned to northeast Rafah. The field commander of the battalion, including Horesh and his fighters, settled into one of the buildings. Some 400 meters from them, not far from a complex of greenhouses, Sarel’s forces settled in. "In the morning, as I was about to put on tefillin, one of the soldiers came up to me and told me that a man on a motorcycle had just passed by outside,” Horesh recounts that fateful Friday. “It was weird and I asked them to stay alert. I thought that maybe because of the ceasefire, a few civilians might be returning already to inspect the damage to their homes. I bent down to take the tefillin, then heard a volley of gunfire.”

The house where Lt. Hadar Goldin was abducted.
(Photo: IDF Spokesperson)
“I remember that shortly before that, Benaya reported that a sniper was spotted in the building across from his position and asked for someone to pick him off. Just then the battalion commander called for all unit commanders to report in, and only Benaya didn’t respond. Another officer reported that he could see bodies on the ground. They were Benaya and Liel. Not far from them was the body of a
terrorist. The rescue team approached them and noticed traces of blood leading to the adjoining building, which looked like a kind of watchtower. Inside they found the opening to a tunnel. Once it became clear that Hadar was missing, a “Cannibal Alert” [soldier abducted] situation was declared.”

Lt. Eitan Fund (Photo: IDF Spokesperson)
The commander, Major Gino, Horesh and the other soldiers rushed to the area of the shooting and took cover behind the greenhouses. On the radio they heard that Lt. Fund went down into the tunnel to search for Goldin. “Eitan realized it would be difficult for him to move forward with all his battle gear on, so he came back up," Horesh said. “We arrived at the place just as he came out of the tunnel. I saw the tunnel entrance on the left corner of the building with its iron lid ajar. Eitan said he could not see anything in the tunnel, so I told him I would go down with him because I had a flashlight on my rifle. We took off our flak jackets and helmets, and took a walkie-talkie. Eitan took a pistol from someone and we went down the iron ladder. The tunnel was completely dark. The flashlight illuminated just a few meters ahead. The air smelled of dust. Eitan shot into the dark, but suddenly his pistol jammed. We decided to continue anyway, and around every 40 meters I shot into the darkness ahead. My ears were constantly ringing because I had no earplugs."

Did you think about the dangers awaiting you in the tunnel?
“Not at first. My body was full of adrenaline and I was just thinking about Hadar. My rifle safety was off with a live bullet in the chamber the whole time we were down there. I thought that if one of the terrorists succeeded to harm me, at least I’d have one bullet to shoot him with before I die. On the top of the tunnel was a wire and I thought it was a booby-trap. I remember that we walked a few minutes following the trail of blood, then we saw the first item that belonged to Hadar. The walkie-talkie didn’t work deep inside the tunnel, so we returned back to report, and then continued searching. As we progressed, we found more of Hadar’s things and there was no doubt he was seriously injured. At one point we got to a fork in the tunnel, so we returned back for reinforcements, and Lt. Shaked Kedar and Staff Sgt. Mekonen Tz'alatz'ao joined us. They also received medals."

Weren’t you afraid it was an ambush?
"That's why we took reinforcements. Tz'alatz'ao was in charge of communications with the officers outside, and Kedar covered us near the fork with his weapon drawn. Eitan and I continued following the blood stains. I saw the drag marks on the ground and realized that Hadar could not walk by himself. We moved about 600 meters and reached a kind of a room with guns, rocket launchers, RPG’s and vests. We were afraid that everything was booby-trapped, but we continued following the tunnel until we got another fork. I noticed blood marks were gone, and it was odd."

What do you think is the reason?
"I believe that the terrorists reached their back-up force and they evacuated Hadar from that point with motorcycles. At that moment Tz'alatz'ao came running and said the brigade commander ordered us out of the tunnel. I was hoping we were called out because they found Hadar. When I realized they hadn’t found him, I was disappointed. But Reconnaissance didn't give up. Our entire force charged the Hamas stronghold, while under fierce gunfire. Our commanders had intelligence information indicating a mosque as the place where is the tunnel exit was located. Our fighters found the opening, but there was no sign Goldin. They were forced to retreat, and two days later our forces returned to Israel."

The silence of warriors
YBA Givat Shmuel
Matan Horesh was born in Bat Yam, and raised in Holon. He attended the YBA yeshiva high school in Givat Shmuel and he spent two years before recruitment at the Shavei Hevron Hesder Yeshiva. In March 2012 he joined the Tracking, Engineering and Sabotage Company of the Givati Brigade. When he finished his officer training course he was supposed to lead a team that was two months away from the end of their basic training, and then continue commanding them in operational missions. The young officer risked his life for a soldier who he didn’t know. He talks about camaraderie and friendship as the highest values, and doesn’t try to hide the difficult moments he experienced during the operation.

“I'll never forget the way we headed back to Israel,” says Horesh recalling those agonizing hours. “The silence of fighters and commanders was like a deafening scream. I saw them all subdued, and it wasn't easy for me to internalize the fact that we had left behind Hadar; we were not able to rescue him. All the way, I thought about his parents, and I wondered how we, as the IDF, would deal with the incident.”
How did you manage to go on?
“It wasn’t easy. For three months I refused to talk about the operation or what I went through in the tunnel. I was surprised when I read the media accounts about the search for Hadar, because I didn’t feel as if we did anything unusual. I wasn't interested in all the talk about citations, and I felt I was becoming closed and dispassionate after the operation. Like, ‘Someone’s getting married? That’s nice. Someone died? Well, life goes on.’ I started to become agitated only after representatives of the IDF's Missing Persons Unit interviewed me about the kidnapping. I couldn’t stop replaying in my mind all the efforts we made to rescue Hadar. It was mostly a process of self-flagellation. I was constantly thinking about what I did wrong and what I could have done differently."

Have you tried to talk with professionals?
“I joined the group therapy discussions in the battalion and told the group that the melancholia that overcame me was bothering me. As if the human part of me was buried. Eventually, I got to the point where I was able to discuss my personal feelings.”

As he describes the dilemmas that accompanied him after the war, it is hard not to think about the description of his actions that earned Horesh the IDF citation. “He showed initiative in his actions, fortitude of character and a willingness to carry out his mision above and beyond the call of duty, and at great personal risk,” said the IDF report. Talking about the medal is awkward for Horesh and he squirms uneasily in his chair. “I didn’t go into the tunnel to win a medal. I never thought that trying to prevent the abduction of a fellow soldier was such a heroic action. IDF teaches us about the importance of not abandoning soldiers in the field, so that's what I did.”

In January this year the media reported that Fund would probably get the Bravery Medal, which was changed to the Distinguished Service Medal, how did you feel when your name was not mentioned?
"At first it was a bit strange, but I didn't care. Three people were killed in that battle, and one of them I knew personally, so why should I waste time over the question of whether someone mentioned my name or not?”

IDF Citation Ceremony (Photo: IDF Spokesperson)
You weren’t offended?
“Definately not. Eitan received the Distinguished Service Medal, because he initiated the tunnel entrance, and entered first. I do not see any less honor in the citation I received, both of us risked our lives for an important purpose.”

Did the kidnapping changed your military perception?
“One of my goals as an educator of officers now is to emphasize to them the importance of being prepared for any extreme situation. You must not be euphoric going into battle, because the battle will not be waged as you expect. Today I believe that were it not for Operation Protective Edge, I would be a very different commander. There is a difference between talking about the battlefield and being a part of it. This is not just theory, but something I experienced. The decision to reject the position of deputy company commander for now, in order to train another cycle of combat officer cadets, was my own. Future officers are the heart of the IDF and the future generation. They are the ones that will affect the soldiers and pass on what I will teach them.”

Will you tell them about your personal experiences and the search for Goldin in the tunnel?
“I believe that the issue will come up.”

Did Operation Protective Edge have any effect on your desire to remain in the army?
I have signed on for another year, and I am not ruling out the option to stay on even longer. I always knew about the importance of the IDF for our country’s defense, but after Operation Protective Edge, that knowledge has been sharpened even more.



MK Nissan Slomiansky: "We need to highlight that Israel is a Jewish state"

"THE GOAL: A SUPREME COURT THAT REPRESENTS THE ENTIRE PUBLIC"

Nissan Slomiansky, the new chairman of the Committee on Constitution, Law and Justice, is against the enactment of Basic Laws and in favor of setting new rules. In a confrontational interview he criticizes the Supreme Court ("Haredim and Arabs feel they are without representation") and promises to see that more and more laws passed by the Knesset will be grounded in Jewish law

By Gideon Alon, ISRAEL TODAY, June 29, 2015 (translation)

MK Nissan Slomiansky
Although only a few weeks have passed since he took office as Chairman of the Knesset Constitution Committee, MK Nissan Slomiansky (Jewish Home) has strong and clear positions on issues of law and justice, and he knows just what he intends to accomplish during his tenure.

Slomiansky (69) has served ten years in the Knesset, but not continuously. He previously served for more than 20 years (1998-1977) as mayor of Elkana, where he lives with his family. He was a founder of the Gush Emunim movement, and the secretary general and member of the Yesha Council. In 1997 he became an MK for the first time on the NRP list. He lost his seat in the next elections to the 15th Knesset, but returned to the Knesset in 2003 as part of the National Union and has served two terms. In the elections to the 18th Knesset he won first place in the list of the Jewish Home party, but gave up his place for the benefit of the late journalist Uri Orbach. In the 19th Knesset was appointed to the prestigious post of chairman of the Finance Committee.

MK Slomiansky is a very hardworking MK and a pleasant person all around. He was born in Ramat Gan and studied at the YBA Nechalim yeshiva high school and then at Yeshivat Hesder Kerem b'Yavneh, where he received rabbinical ordination. He also has two Master’s degrees, in Physics from Bar-Ilan University, and in Jewish Law from Tel Aviv University.

The Chairman of the Constitution Committee makes no secret of the criticism he has of the Supreme Court, and in particular the judicial activism of the former Chief Justice Aharon Barak. When I reminded him that eight years have passed since Barak resigned, he replies: "But his spirit still reigns there in the Supreme Court."

"The court is not the legislator"

The platform of the Jewish Home party says that you oppose the excessive and unnecessary intervention of the Supreme Court in legalization. What does that mean?

"During the period of Justice Barack, the Supreme Court became the country's chief legislator. For example when I was a legislator, I passed a law that had a particular purpose with explanations and justifications. But when the law came up for judicial review, Barak said: 'I interpret the law differently than the legislature,’ and from that moment on, his interpretation became the binding interpretation in all circumstances.

"Barak also assumed the authority to overturn laws passed by the legislature, which was never the intended role of the Supreme Court. He was not the legislature. If he thought that a law needed changing, there were ways that he could unofficially direct the attention of the politicians to changing the law. The Knesset is the democratic body elected by the public, and therefore the Court must act in accordance with the laws of the Knesset, and assume the authority to overrule them."

You also claim that the Supreme Court is disconnected and does not reflect the general public. How so?

"I'll give you a few examples. In the Barak era the Court upgraded two laws that the Knesset enacted as ordinary laws into Basic Laws [referring to the Basic Law: Human Dignity and Liberty and Basic Law: Freedom of Occupation - GA]. This gave these laws enormous power comparable to a constitution, and then the Court began to compare any new law that the Knesset enacted to these Basic Laws. If Barak’s understanding of the new law passed by the legislature contradicted a Basic Law, he abolished the new legislation. You understand what tremendous authority he assumed for himself? Furthermore, analysis of Supreme Court rulings made by various parties clearly proves that there is still a strong tendency toward the Left on the Court. I aspire that the Supreme Court will be connected to the public, with everyone being represented in some way. Today there are sectors of the general public, including the ultra-Orthodox and the Arabs, who do not feel that the court represents them, and that for all intents and purposes, the Court exists in a vacuum; and that's not good. Once wider sectors of the public feel that the Supreme Court represents them, it will give the Court legitimacy. "

"Change the composition of the committee"

How will you handle this situation?

"First of all by expanding the composition of the Judicial Appointments Committee, so that there will be three ministers instead of two and three MKs instead of two, because today there are three judges on committee who typically operate in coordination with two representatives of the Israel Bar Association, thus controlling a majority on the committee. We need to create a situation on the committee where five committee members will not be able to veto judicial appointments."

Why are you against legislation of other Basic Laws to complete a Constitution?

"In principle, we are against Basic Laws and a Constitution, because we believe that Israel already has a constitution and it is the Bible. In one of the meetings of the Knesset Constitution Committee, which was attended by Justice Barak, I argued with him about the importance of the Constitution. I asked him: 'If you have a constitution, who will interpret it?' And he replied, ‘the Supreme Court.’ I told him I thought the constitution should interpreted by a special court established just for constitutional review, or another external entity composed of public figures, to which he replied: ‘If so, then there is no point to a Constitution.’ The meaning of his words is that once the Constitution is ratified with the Supreme Court as its interpreter - then there will be nothing to prevent the Supreme Court becoming the supreme sovereign."

Your party's platform states that "legislation should be avoided that imposes religious or secular standards, and the status of Jewish law should be upgraded in the country.” What does that mean?

"There's no reason for there to be a conflict between the legislation in the Knesset and Jewish law. To date, no legislation passed by the legislature contradicts Jewish law. It is very important that the Jewish state should incorporate as many concepts as possible from traditional Jewish law in our modern legal system, because many of the 3,000 year-old laws have much beauty. I submitted a bill that states that every lacuna in modern legislation should include precedents found in Jewish law. Jewish law will thereby be modernized while at the same time enriching our modern law."

Do you support the proposal to split the roles of the Attorney General into two positions, one Legal Counsel to the government and the other to head the Public Prosecutor’s Office?

"The issue of separation of the functions of the Attorney General and the head of public prosecution is a heavy topic that needs to be changed, but it should be carried out in a serious manner. I intend to hold in-depth hearings on this issue. The current situation is not good, the Attorney General is essentially the landlord for all ".

"Everyone is equal before the law"

How about the phenomenon of corruption in law enforcement, prosecution, police and among lawyers?

"There is no doubt that it is a very difficult situation when the heads of government - including a former president, a former prime minister, a former finance minister and others - are sent to prison or convicted of serious crimes. Nevertheless, we should view in a positive light the fact that the state is waging a campaign against corruption in such cases, and does not flinch from prosecuting even the most senior positions in government. We must invest in denouncing these kinds of phenomena in our educational system, even in early childhood education."

Look do you think will be the highlight of your activity in your current term of office?

"We need to highlight any parliamentary legislation that first of all, Israel is a Jewish state. When Barak was president of the Supreme Court, he turned the tables and explained Jewish state as something amorphous and abstract. Therefore, with any law enacted by the Knesset we must emphasize that we are a Jewish state, and interpret what the Jewish moral tradition is in this area of Statecraft. Take for example the Law of Return. When the state was established the state’s leaders had the wisdom to enact the Law of Return, as well as family law governing marriage and divorce, so that we can live here as a Jewish state. We also will need to make changes in the laws regarding governance and national sovereignty. "


Slomiansky believes he has a chance to promote these changes: "A leader needs to have ambition, a desire to move forward, and to know what he wants to accomplish. It’s a bit difficult with a coalition of 61 Knesset members, but I'm optimistic."

BACK TO THE BEIT MIDRASH

YBA has found the secret to instilling a love of learning Torah in the hearts of their students: a return to the classical formula of Hevruta study in the Beit Midrash

By Moshe Glanz, ARUTZ SHEVA NEWS (translation)

YBA yeshiva high school students in the Beit Midrash
In the ongoing discussions over the past several years about how to make Gemara (Talmud) study more popular among yeshiva high school students, the YBA educational network began developing two years ago a new method of teaching Talmud, which has gained momentum in the past year. This year the method was applied in 16 different Bnei Akiva yeshiva high schools throughout the country, and the network plans on expanding the system to more schools next year. The goal is to double the number of participating students from 800 to 1,500, with the assistance of the Religious Education Department of the Ministry of Education.

Not like Math and English

On of the initiators of the change was Rabbi Meir Toiber, Rosh Yeshiva of YBA Netiv Meir in Jerusalem. In an interview with B’sheva, Rabbi Toiber explained that the decision for the change was made after a gradual decline in the total number of hours dedicated to Gemara study in yeshiva high schools over the past 15 years for various reasons. As a result, the Beit Midrash (study hall) was hardly being used for the purpose of independent learning. "We realized that in order to instill the love of Torah in our students we would need to turn the situation around 180 degrees."

What was the method of study before the change?

"The students perceived the Morning Seder (study session) in the Beit Midrash as preparation time for the class in Talmud that followed, in which the teacher would cover everything they needed to know anyway. This created a feeling that Talmud was just like any other subject. We finally came to the conclusion that the reason why our students were lacking motivation to study Talmud," he says. "was that they felt the same, whether studying for a Talmud lesson, a math lesson or an English lesson. But if we look deeply into the concept of Torah study, we understand that the Talmudic competence is acquired not only from hearing a lecture, but through struggling to understand a passage in the text through the give-and-take of independent study with a hevruta (study partner)."

The Talmud consists of the Mishna, Gemara and commentaries
Rabbi Yehuda Felix, who until six months ago, was the head of Education Department at Yeshivot Bnei Akiva educational network, properly understood the need to change the equation. , and together with Rabbi Toiber and the financial backing of YBA benefactor, Mr. Benjamin Landy, it was decided to change the Morning Seder both literally and figuratively. "This is a significant change;" Rabbi Toiber states. "it is not just about learning in an hour and a half. We moved the Talmud lesson to before the Morning Seder so that everything learned in the classroom becomes preparation for the Seder session itself, where students sit with their study partners and actively acquire the skills for learning Talmud." According to Rabbi Toiber, this self-instruction experience leads to a love of Torah because it provides the natural connection to the Torah that was so lacking before.

The results were not long in coming. A few months after some of the yeshiva high schools decided to adopt and began implementing the system, the initiators realized that they had caught a wave. "I had students tell me happily: ‘Before Talmud was just another subject for me; now I understand that what I am doing is learning to learn Torah.’” That proves to me that this is a big change," Rabbi Toiber says enthusiastically.  "Just recently, I went into the Beit Midrash of one of our yeshiva high schools to look for a certain teacher, and I saw dozens of boys sitting and learning with their hevruta partners. I looked to my right and to my left and couldn’t find their rabbi. When I approached the students and asked them where he was, they replied: ‘He is in reserve duty [in the IDF].’"

Rabbi Toiber could not resist and asked: “So why are you sitting and learning in the Beit Midrash instead of playing ball outside?” The students did not understand the question. "It's an amazing thing," he continues smiling. "This shows that the change worked. The students understood that they acquired Torah by sitting and learning with their hevruta. This should not to be taken as a given – these are fruits that we had not seen before. At the end of the year we visited all the Yeshivot and met with students, teachers and yeshiva heads. They filled out feedback sheets, and we discovered a huge surge in love of learning Torah. All the measures of attention, attachment and motivation were well above anything we had ever seen before."

Does not contradict matriculation

It is no secret that in Bnei Akiva yeshiva high schools there is tension between the desire to study Torah and the connection to the real world. But according to Rabbi Toiber, the struggle between different forces only proves that Torah study must receive greater expression. "Over the years the students have come to expect and demand high achievement levels in both general and Judaic studies matriculation scores. This “wanting it all” demands that we provide enrichment in both directions," he explains. "Ultimately, the ideal of the yeshiva is that Torah should influence every aspect of life - everything," he says. "Our concept is: be a military man, be a lawyer, be a farmer, merchant or be anything you want; but on one condition: that you stay connected to the Torah. The connection to Torah must not be just intellectual; it must be a spiritual link. It is clear to me that students should learn for matriculation tests, but all subjects must be wrapped up in the connection to Torah."

Following the success of the initiative, YBA wants to expand to an even higher level. "We want to eventually include another measure of success – we hope to have our students writing term papers on the Talmudic issues they dealt with during the year."

When learning Torah becomes achievement oriented, don’t you lose something of the value of learning Torah for its own sake?

"First of all, that’s a great question. And you’re right, that is a difficult challenge," says Rabbi Toiber. "But it is important to emphasize that we are not talking here about just a positive learning experience." According to him, the bottom line must be that the students master in depth the Talmud they were studying during the year. "When we ask the students what is the conclusion of a Talmudic passage they learned, they need to know the answer, and not just that they enjoyed studying it. That’s not how you raise Talmidei Chachamim. We need to work simultaneously on both aspects, so that on the one hand they will learn the proper tools of Torah study with their hevruta that will serve them later in life, and on the other hand to professionally measure their scholastic achievement."

How do you intend to move the process forward in the years ahead?


"We are moving forward in two ways: first by training our Talmud teachers to use this method effectively. We are already doing this and we will do even more next year. Secondly, this year we included 16 Bnei Akiva yeshiva high schools, and by expanding next year to 22 schools, the number of students participating in the initiative will double. Thus, gradually we believe, we will succeed in bringing back the sounds of Talmud study to all the yeshiva high schools in the Bnei Akiva network." Rabbi Toiber explains, "Our goal is to increase Torah and glorify it."

Tikun Olam - UBA Orot Modiin student wins Volunteer of the Year Award

All 74 schools in the YBA Educational Network educate their students to put into practice the Jewish values of Tikun Olam and Gemilut Chasadim through weekly volunteer activities in the community, effectively improving the lives of thousands of needy Israelis of all ages.

UBA Orot Modiin senior, Carmel Amir
In Modiin, a growing young city in the heart of Israel, Mayor Haim Bibas has made a tradition of awarding certificates of appreciation to 15 twelfth graders each year recognizing them for their contributions to the community through their volunteer activities,with one of the 15 nominees being chosen for the Volunteer of the Year Award.

At the high-point of this years ceremony, attended by municipal officials, educators, family and friends of the nominees, Mayor Bibas announced that Carmel Amir (17), from Ulpanat Bnei Akiva Orot Modiin, was the 2015 winner of the coveted award. 

Carmel, who is also a leader in the local Israeli Scouts youth movement, was cited for her contribution to society for her leadership role for the past few years in the city's "Birthday Clowns" project. The project organizes and hosts birthday parties for children from needy families in cooperation with the municipality's welfare department.

Mayor Bibas praised Carmel as a worthy role model for her peers, who gives to others with all her heart. "I makes me feel proud to to be the mayor of a city that is blessed with so many youth who are imbued with the spirit of volunteerism. It begins in the home and extends to the values they learn in our schools. I want to thank our youth for all that they do for the benefit of the community."

Carmel Amir with her fellow "Birthday Clowns" volunteers
UBA Orot Modiin was established in 1998 as one of the first high schools in Modiin, and serves over 700 girls in grades 7 through 12 today. The school has won many awards, and is on the cutting edge of educational technology in Israel, with personal laptops for each student replacing traditional textbooks and paper-based homework assignments.

Learn more about the 74 schools in the YBA Educational Network by viewing the Interactive Map on our website. YBA - TRAINING ISRAEL'S FUTURE.

YBA Nechalim seventh grader wins national math competition

YBA Nechalim student Yehonatan Hermetz
receiving Mathematical Kangaroo Award
YBA Nachal Yitzchak, Nechalim seventh grade student Yehonatan Hermetz won first prize for his age category at the International Mathematical Kangaroo competition held recently at the Weizmann Institute. The Kangaroo competition is one of the most popular math competitions in the world, and its main objectives are to attract more students to engage in solving mathematical problems and prove that mathematics is not threatening but can instead be challenging and fun. According to the organizers of Kangaroo, the key competence tested by the competition is logical combination, not just pure knowledge of formulas.
The competition was introduced in Australia over 20 years ago, and functions today in over 60 countries. This year in Israel about 2,000 students in grades two through ten from schools throughout the country participated in the competition, with separate levels for each age group. Yehonatan was the national champion for the Seventh Grade. We congratulate Yehonatan and wish him continued success!
YBA Nachal Yitzchak is one of the first Bnei Akiva residential yeshiva high schools, established in 1955 at Moshav Nechalim, near Petach Tikvah. Today the school serves 485 students from seventh through twelfth grades. Many of the school's graduates serve in leadership positions in all areas of Israeli society, including singer Dudu Fisher, actor Shuli Rand, Member of Knesset Nissan Slomianski, professor of law Yedidya Stern and Chief Rabbi of Petach Tikva, Micha Halevi.

To learn more about how the alumni of YBA schools have influenced every facet of Israeli society, visit the Our Graduates page on our website. 

YESHIVOT BNEI AKIVA EDUCATIONAL NETWORK - TRAINING ISRAEL'S FUTURE.

UBA Meron students win first place in national Robotics competition

Four seventh grade girls from Ulpanat Bnei Akiva Meron took first place in a national Robotics competition the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology) and sponsored by the Ministry of Science, Space and Technology. The four are Tikva Weiner, Hadar Sofer, Shirel Cohen and Niria Zinner.

UBA Meron Robotics Team receiving prize
from Minister Danny Danon
Over 300 junior high school students from over 100 schools participated in the annual nationwide competition. This year's challenge was particularly difficult. the teams of students had to program three different robots to fulfill three distinct roles and interact with each other. One robot was a car, another a pedestrian and the third a stoplight. The students had to program the robots so that the car moving along a road would stop at the red stop light or when approaching the pedestrian, and start again when the light turned green or the pedestrian had passed. The team succeeding in the shortest time was the winner.

Science, Space and Technology Minister Danny Danon, was very pleased that the competition was won by a group of girls. "One of the main goals I set for myself upon entering the ministry was to significantly increase the number of girls studying the physical sciences at the junior high and high school level," he said. In congratulating the winners, the minister stressed the importance of such competitions in sparking the imagination and creativity of young students, as Robotics promises to be the dominant field of research and economic growth for the future.

UBA Meron was established in 1975 a short distance from the YBA Bar Yochai yeshiva high school for boys, at Moshav Meron in the Upper Galilee, where the tomb of Rabbi Shimon Bar-Yochai is located. The ulpana serves over 300 girls, mostly from towns and agricultural settlements in northern Israel. The ruins of the ancient town of Meron, mentioned in the Book of Joshua, are located just above the moshav on the southern slope of Mount Meron,

To learn more about our schools visit the interactive map of YBA institutions in Israel on our website.

IDF Manpower Chief: "Hesder Yeshiva students bring an added value to the army"

Maj. Gen. Hagai Topolinsky
Major General Hagai Topolinsky, the newly appointed head of IDF Personnel Directorate, recently met with the heads of the Hesder Yeshiva Association at the home of Rabbi Haim Drukman in Merkaz Shapira. General Topolinsky listened to the Roshei Yeshiva describe their educational philosophy in training students to serve in the army while at the same time training to become Torah scholars, the difficulties they face in running their yeshivot and their vision for the future.

In response, Topolinsky said, "Your Hesder Yeshivot are producing high-quality individuals who are role models for the other soldiers of Zionism and Jewish values. This is a bonus for the IDF - an added value - that is unparalleled." He added, "Our major challenge in Israeli society is to bring together and unite the various sectors of our population. You have an important role to play in achieving that goal."

General Topolinsky recalled to the rabbis his personal memories of commanding Hesder soldiers in the army, "The norms of behavior, Jewish values and Zionist idealism that the Hesder yeshiva students bring with them to the army, I tell you, are the envy of the entire community, including secular Israelis. It is a pleasure to serve as their commander, and we very much appreciate them."

Photos of the 36th Annual AFYBA Gala are now online!

CLICK HERE to view a slide show of the event.

The 36th Annual AFYBA Gala was held on June 10th at Guastavino's, under the 59th Street Bridge in New York City. The 220 participants enjoyed a program presented by emcee Jessica Abo (pictured, left) featuring videos of the four Honorees, Harvey M. Krueger, Minister of Education Naftali BennettRabbi Shlomo Kimche and author Tuvia Tenenbom, a keynote address by former Head of Israel's National Security Council, Major General (Ret.) Yaakov Amidror, and musical accompaniment by the YBA Kinor David Jazz Ensemble and Violinist/Composer Ittai Shapira.





YBA Kinor David wins 1st Place in NY Jewish Music Festival

YBA Kinor David Jazz Ensemble
performing at the NY  Jewish Music Festival
The Kinor David Jazz Ensemble won First Place in NY Jewish Music Festival on June 7th, from among 32 performers at the Symphony Space Theatre. The packed audience enjoyed an electric performance of Rabbi Moti Hershkop's original composition, "Hashem, Ma Rabu Zaray."


Rabbi Hershkop heads the YBA Kinor David musical yeshiva high school in Israel, which trains young musicians for advance matriculation in musical studies, and a lifetime and careers that combine music and Jewish spirituality.

YBA KInor David Jazz Ensemble at OZ
The five boys in the ensemble spend the weekend as guests of Congregation Ohab Zedek on the upper West side, where Rabbi Hershkop acted as Hazzan and gave a guest sermon.

This is the first time that any of the Israeli boys has been in New York. They will provide the musical background ambiance at the AFYBA 36th Annual Gala at Guastavino's on Wednesday evening.

The ensemble will be performing tonight, June 8th, at Talia's Steakhouse on the Upper West Side from 7:30 till the lights go out....Come join the fun!

Education Minister Naftali Bennett to students: "The key to success in any profession you choose is to deal with the future.”

Education Minister Naftali Bennett Goes Back to School

bennett school
Naftali Bennett is the new Minister of Education, and as such, has decided to do some field work. On Thursday morning, he left his office and went to visit an actual classroom with real students at the Carol School in Petach Tikva. But he wasn’t a passive spectator. He rolled up his sleeves and actually taught a math class to 6th graders, which was titled ‘The Importance of Numbers in the Environment in Which We Live’.Walla News was there and gave the minister top grades.
As part of the lesson, Bennett, who made his personal fortune in high-tech, taught them how a smartphone works. The purpose of the lesson was to show them that math is not just numbers, but could be “the next Iron Dome for Israel”.
The school was chosen at random but the lesson was not. Bennett has declared one of his objectives to be the improvement of the study of mathematics in Israel, something which has been waning in recent years, a situation he refers to as a ‘strategic danger’.
He was received by the students with a choir singing Israeli songs and introduced himself as “the math teacher for the day, called Naftali”.
He opened the lesson by asking the students what machine they would like to build, and received a number of responses, including a time machine and a glider.  He asked them, “What is common to all inventions?”
The students answered, “Imagination, technology, computers.”
“Have you ever taken a picture and sent it by WhatsApp or iPhone?” Bennett asked, adding: “Today we will learn how an image moves from device to device.” After a little exercise Bennett explained to students pixels, megapixels, and other concepts involved in the process.”
After the tour, Bennett said to the students, “The success of your generation will determine the mathematics of Israel’s success. Our challenge is to make you love the profession of science and mathematics, and to understand that the key to success in any profession you choose is to deal with the future.”